Dr. Patricia Hilliard-Nunn

HilliardNunn

 

Adjunct Associate Professor, African American Studies Program

hilliardnunn@ufl.edu

Dr. Patricia Hilliard-Nunn earned her doctorate in Mass Communication from Florida State University in 1993.  She owns Makare Publishing Company and works as an independent media producer. Her areas of research include: Media and Culture, Audience Analysis, Enslaved Africans in Alachua County, African American History in Alachua County.  Her creative practices include Media Production, West African Dance & Mixed Media Art. Before teaching in African America Studies, she taught Black Women and Film in the  Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research at the University of Florida and served various populations while working as a Community Organizer in Alachua County.

Courses for Fall 2011

Senior Seminar Ifulfills partial requirement for the African American Studies minor. This is one of two Senior Seminar courses that are required.  The goal of this course is to introduce students to some of the conceptual and operational methods used to research and write about the experiences of African Americans.  The course is interdisciplinary and seeks to develop in students, a knowledge view that consciously applies methodology, theory and language from more than one discipline in examining central themes, issues, problems, topics, or experiences of people of African descent in the Americas. During the course, students will learn to read and interpret research literature, abstract journal articles, complete research exercises, study the research practices of other scholars, prepare an annotated bibliography and write a research proposal. 

The Black Experience: Psychological Perspectives is an interdisciplinary course where students critically examine concepts, issues and theories related to the psychology of African Americans.  This course takes a multidisciplinary approach to examine psychological perspectives related to and underpinning the field of Black/African American Psychology. In addition to exploring the history of Black Psychology, students examine theories and concepts that help explain the varied experiences of African Americans. We explore the impact of oppression on the Black psyche as well as some of the conscious and subconscious ways that African Americans have structured ways to succeed and excel. Some of the topics  that we explore include identity, racism, discrimination, family/kinship, mental, spiritual and physical health, education and achievement, interpersonal relationships, language, and the social, cultural and political landscape. The includes student debates, group presentations, class discussions, lectures and film screenings.

Spring 2012

Senior Seminar II is interdisciplinary and seeks to develop in students, a knowledge view that consciously applies methodology and language from more than one discipline in examining central themes, issues, problems, topics, or experiences of African Americans.  During the course, students will refine the research proposal that they completed in Senior Seminar I. Students will read and interpret research literature, conduct interdisciplinary research and write a research paper related to her/his area of interest.  Syllabus

Blacks in Media:  Filmprovides a comprehensive examination of the history, culture and politics of African/Black people and film. While the course focuses on African Americans and film, it will also touch on filmmakers and films in the African Diaspora. The course reviews the manner in which Blacks have participated in varied aspects of the film communication process including (i.e. writing, directing, actors, producers, distributors, exhibitors, spectators, critics, etc.). Students will also be introduced to several theories and concepts that can prove useful as they make sense of black independent and mainstream films from the past and present and their impact on society.

Theories of Black America is a survey course which takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the examination of some of the important theories and concepts used to explain black social, political and cultural behavior in the United States. Scholars in each social science discipline have grappled with complex social issues affecting the overall or larger black experience. Their works have resulted in theories (some controversial) that not only proposed to explain Black behavior, but also have become the foundation for social policy and public discourse.  The course is an intensive reading seminar designed to provide an introduction to the theoretical debates about the Black experience that have taken place over the past century.

 

Introduction to African American StudiesThe experience of Africans in America has been broad and deep. Our study of that experience will begin in Africa, the birthplace of civilization and humanity. It is impossible to capture each element of the journey, but we will take an interdisciplinary approach to explore some of the political, cultural, economic, artistic and social themes that have influenced the construction of African American realities. Class sessions will consist of lectures, discussions, exercises, film screenings, and presentations. Syllabus